Imperial College London

UK DRI at Imperial College London

"The UK DRI at Imperial brings new perspectives to prevent, delay or reverse dementia. We focus on the earliest stages when benefits to those who may be affected will be greatest." Prof Paul Matthews
UK DRI Associate Director

1. At a glance

People with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and other types of dementia experience a variety of progressive symptoms – such as memory loss, mental decline and personality changes. So understandably, much of the current research into dementia is focussed on the brain – to explore what leads to the gradual loss of function and death of neurons.

The UK DRI at Imperial brings together researchers from diverse backgrounds with fresh perspectives. They draws on the university’s unique strengths, resources and focus on science, engineering, medicine and business. The team recognises that the challenges of dementia demand new concepts, new approaches and a diverse range of new research tools and directions. Their holistic approach views the ageing brain in the context of the ageing body, not in isolation. Studies from individual cells through to whole systems are creating a new vision of what can go wrong and lead to dementia. Our multidisciplinary approach brings new expertise to focus on the challenges of dementia research. Investigators are addressing the transition from vulnerability to the expression of neurodegenerative pathology by exploring individual variation across populations, influences of the gut on the brain, mutual interactions between neurons and glia (immune cells) and roles for homeostatic mechanisms of sleep in pathological processes.

The centre aims to identify what goes wrong in the brain at the very earliest stages of dementia and to develop innovative treatments that can correct detrimental changes, which could greatly benefit people who are at increased risk of disease but have not yet developed symptoms – preventing or slowing down the onset of disease.

Visit UK DRI at Imperial's local website for up-to-date news.

2. Scientific goals

The researchers at this centre view the ageing brain in the context of the ageing body, using approaches that integrate function – from individual cells through to systems and populations. The objectives are translational so that people with dementia and their families realise the benefits from research as rapidly as possible.

The approach starts from the view that most of the major advances in the understanding of dementia have been drawn from the discovery of genetic determinants of susceptibility. However, these contribute only partially to the expression of disease. An additional major component of this is related to the effects of influences arising from - or acting via - the whole body: co-morbid systemic diseases, the environment and lifestyle. The centre is addressing Alzheimer's disease and related dementia as systemic diseases. In an increasingly sub-specialised clinical and research world, this challenges more usual research strategies. 

The approach is built around four investigative themes:

  • Neuroinflammation
  • Circadian Neurobiology
  • Metabolomics and Microbiome
  • Microcircuits and Brain Systems

The team includes complementary expertise that together have a unique potential to address these questions. It has a critical mass of internationally leading investigators in metabolomics, the microbiome and molecular neuroepidemiology. They have developed, or contribute to, large population studies that provide access to the detailed linkage of the genetic and detailed clinical and lifestyle data of people before they develop dementia. 

Other investigators have been leaders in fundamental and clinical investigations of multiple sclerosis, arguably the “paradigmatic” neuroinflammatory, neurodegenerative disorder. The expertise in circadian neurobiology promises to discover novel mechanisms by which altered sleep patterns enhance neuronal stress and accelerate neurodegeneration. Outputs from these programmes together can then be focused on how brain microcircuits become dysfunctional in the early disease and how their associated neuronal systems can be therapeutically modulated bioelectronically.

3. Collaborations

Within UK DRI

  • Prof Julie Williams, UK DRI at Cardiff
  • Dr Gaynor Ann Smith, UK DRI at Cardiff
  • Dr Owen Peters, UK DRI at Cardiff
  • Prof Caleb Webber, UK DRI at Cardiff
  • Prof Giles Hardingham, UK DRI at Edinburgh
  • Prof Bart De Strooper, UK DRI at UCL
  • Dr Carlo Frigerio, UK DRI at UCL
  • Prof John Hardy, UK DRI at UCL
  • Prof Joanna Wardlaw, UK DRI at UCL

Beyond UK DRI

The UK DRI at Imperial creates a broad range of opportunities to reach out to world-leading research groups across Imperial College London, including the:

The centre’s integration with the NIHR Imperial Biomedical Research Centre (BRC) Brain Sciences Theme is also facilitating collaboration with clinical science in this area. 

The Parkinson’s UK and Multiple Sclerosis Society Tissue Banks hosted by Imperial College London are part of the MRC UK Brain Banks Network.

4. Topics

Neuroinflammation, ageing, circadian neurobiology, metabolomics and microbiome, microcircuits and brain systems

5. Techniques

Imaging Mass Cytometry, CyToF technology, FACS, 3D cell culture, multi-electrode arrays, vivo 2-P imaging of calcium activity, slice electrophysiology and Patch-seq, non-invasive bioelectronic stimulation (temporal interference stimulation), AAV and mouse models, virally-delivered FosTRAP technology, proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR) spectrometry, ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC)-mass spectrometry (MS), EEG, fMRI, temporal interference (TI) stimulation, finite element method (FEM), modelling, in vivo patch-clamp recording, metabolomics, computational modelling, spectral profiling techniques, next-generation sequencing, DESI imaging, scRNASeq, ATACSeq and IF proteomic mass spectromic characterisation, PET scanning, snRNAseq, high field and ultra high field MRI functional mapping, tether-free EEG recordings and analysis of sleep-wake patterns, c-fos-dependent activity-tagging (also known as TetTagging), automated sleep deprivation protocols; in vitro and in vivo optogenetic and pharmacogenetic stimulation of tagged circuitry; behavioural analysis; brain slice electrophysiology; in vivo dialysis.

6. Scientific Advisory Board

7. Vacancies

Visit our Join Us page to see opportunities available at this centre.

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8. Meet the team

Holmes

Elaine Holmes

  • UK DRI Group Leader
  • Gut-brain interactions through the microbiome
  • Imperial College London
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Jennifer Podesta

Jennifer Podesta

  • Centre Manager, UK DRI at Imperial
  • Imperial College London
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Marco Brancaccio

Marco Brancaccio

  • UK DRI Group Leader
  • Circadian dysfunction in the early stages of Alzheimer's disease - Sleep theme
  • Imperial College London
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Nir Grossman

Nir Grossman

  • UK DRI Group Leader
  • Interventional Systems Neuroscience
  • Imperial College London
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Eliiot

Paul Elliott

  • UK DRI Group Leader
  • Linking genetic, epidemiology and metabolic phenotyping in dementia in the context of aging, environment and lifestyle
  • Imperial College London
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Paul Matthews5

Paul Matthews

  • UK DRI Associate Director
  • Glial-neuronal homeostatic mechanisms with amyloid pathology
  • Imperial College London
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Samuel Barnes

Samuel Barnes

  • UK DRI Group Leader
  • Micro-circuit homeostasis in early Alzheimer's disease
  • Imperial College London
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William Wisden

William Wisden

  • UK DRI Group Leader
  • Sleep and dementia
  • Imperial College London
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Founding funders

Latest tweets from @UKDRI

We're working across the spectrum of diseases that give rise to dementia 🧠 Explore our group leader profiles and f… https://t.co/5sgOxvh6u9
19 Nov 2019 17:55

RT @jojacksonhere: I wish I had this when I was characterising spine morphology...those long analysis days still haunt me! https://t.co/LJA
19 Nov 2019 17:43